Training the Forgotten

Recently I’ve decided to look upon my drawing past again, with the sad fact I probably can’t and ever won’t recover the tens or maybe even hundreds of sketches from high school, college and before. I didn’t take much things with me to England, let alone to Kuwait, but a bunch of soft graphite pencils traveled with me and are haunting the drawer in my table now, so why not to make a use of them.
The problem with drawing skills is that it is indeed not comparable to riding a bicycle and you’re completely capable to forget it all, without any ongoing practice. So did I.
And since I’m stubborn and dedicated as far as I want something, I’ve started from scratch, practicing and drawing and sketching and being completely mad at myself, not noting the great deal of disappointment that I can’t even remotely draw as I used to – and weeks and months of drawing are ahead of me, IF I want to get at least on par with past, or maybe even better.
I’ve got some exercise books which don’t take any beginner lightly and smack you right at start with dozens of drill and copying so you can get it back in hand again. They’re merciless to your mistakes, but in the end, if one wants to draw, he shouldn’t expect much soft approach on the side of other artists, right..?


Here’s my first sketch – purely exercise to get the movement back into hand and of awful quality, but hey, I’m trying! For anyone interested, I’m using two books – The Natural Way to Draw: A Working Plan for Art Study & Charles Bargue with the collaboration of Jean-Léon Gérôme: Drawing Course.

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