Religion

The Kuwait Constitution Articles 35 and 36

Article 35 of Kuwait constitution: Freedom of belief is absolute. The country protects all religions symbols.

Article 36 of Kuwait constitution: Freedom of expression is protected. Every person has that right in speaking, writing, or any method.

LWDLIK – So why is the building of churches being curtailed? Why are art exhibitions stopped? Why is the death penalty for blasphemy being introduced? Something much more serious is at hand: The challenging of the constitution – the very basis of law and protection of the people.

Related articles outside blog:
Kuwait must stop introduction of death penalty for blasphemy – Amendment massive step backwards: Amnesty
Assembly nods to death penalty for blasphemy – MPs press govt over laid-off Kuwaitis
Muslim Brotherhood plans to take over Kuwait by 2013: Khalfan
Christians face shortage of churches in Kuwait – Easter celebrated around the country
Art exhibit raided, gallery closed down
Artist ‘more determined’ after ban
Kuwait DSLR Camera Ban Now in Effect

Bulgarian Heaters

Indeed, and they seem to be favoured over the Chinese ones here. No blame, I have goose bombs whenever I read or hear Made in China unless it counts for more than few thousand years old; but Kuwaiti people seem to have this other obsession and that is “What is from Europe, is always best / most chic / most in / reliably working!”. Now, I can’t say it’s not, and in many cases it will still probably be better option over anything made in China in the recent years.
But when we were roaming the souks for an oil heater I was surprised by the “Bulgarian, Bulgarian, buy, buy!” attitude of some shop assistants, to be honest. When I was faced with the choice of Chinese heater vs. Bulgarian one, I was really surprised as both options seemed rather crazy to me – not to the others, though!
Well, we’ve got ourselves a small, portable (Bulgarian) heater now, which is used most of the day but mainly in our bedroom. So spoiled, we are now. The room temperature hits 20 degrees and we go all bonkers with pullovers, fluffy socks, hot teas and a heater turned on the higher level.



Over the day when hubby’s at work and kiddo at school I steal the small warmth provider for my room and tug in a blanket with green tea (or milk with coffee, formerly known as coffee with milk, but due to the small inhabitant prohibited as alcohol in Kuwait now, by my husband mainly) and a book. I’m getting much better with my speed of reading in English though, sadly.
Meaning I can read one book in a day – meaning I need a lot of books to keep myself busy and that’s a lot of trips to Virgin store and a lot of KDs spent on printed paper and all that hassle my beloved half hates so much. On the other hand I’m glad my English isn’t so rusty just yet, under the influence of arabized English of Kuwait and me being all but a good student.

Random evenings are now filled with either the classical heater-book-iPod-PC-TV laziness, or hussainiyah visits for religious lessons on the event of Ashura and eventually the whole month of Muharram. Dori loves it, not for the mourning, but for the fact that to keep her silent and busy she can borrow my old – and long time broken – Tamagotchi. Soon to be hers, as soon as my new toy comes!
Yes, I’m quite playful, sometimes. But the EMS from Japan is not cooperating with me, and with the sorry state of Kuwait postal service I’ll be glad to get it this year and uncut, ungutted and working, even. Hope never dies! Oh wait, was that love?
Nevermind, let’s hope my present to myself will arrive in tact and soon! Off to hussainiyah now.

Covering Body in Muslim Prayer (Salat)

While offering prayers, a man should cover his private parts even if no one is looking at him. As for a woman, she should cover her entire body while offering prayers, including her head and hair. It is not necessary for her to cover that part of her face, which is washed while performing Wudhu, or the hands up to the wrists, (or the upper feet up to the ankles, if there is no stranger).

There are six conditions for the dress used in Salat:

It should be clean.
It should be Mubah, as an obligatory precaution.
It should not be made of the parts of a dead body.
It should not be made from pure silk. (Ruling for men only.)
It should not have any gold objects. (Ruling for men only.)
It should not be made of carcass, whose meat is Harram. If a clothe is made from leather, it should be from an animal whose meat is halal.

Place on which prayer is offered must not be usurped. If a person prays on a usurped property, his prayers are void.
Being stable. The place for prayers should not have such a vigorous movement, which would make normal standing, Ruku or Sajdah impossible. In fact, it should not prevent the body from being at ease.
It should not make body or clothes of a person who wants to offer prayers Najis. If the place where one wishes to pray is Najis, it should not be so wet that its moisture would reach the body or the dress of the person praying except than those kinds of Nejasat which are negligible in Salat.
Men should stand in front of women. Women should stand behind men while praying. It is better that her place of Sajdah placed a little back from where a man stands for Salat. Hence, if a woman stands in front of a man, or in the same line, Salat is void.

Source: Grand Ayatollah Sayyid Ali Al-Sistani

What Invalidates Prayer

Urine or excretion, Janabah, menses.
One of the invalidating agents of prayer is to turn away from Qibla intentionally or forgetfully, or turning to right or left from Qibla or even turning intentionally so much that it is not towards Qibla in general view.
Whatever act that changes the appearance of prayer. For example, if a person moves his body voilently like a dancing or jumping, it invalidates prayer.
Uttering a word or words intentionally.
Intentional, loud and uncontrollable laugh.
If one intentionally weeps loudly over some worldly matters, his Prayer will be void. But if he weeps silently or loudly due to fear of Allah, or for the hereafter, there is no harm in it. In fact, it is among the best acts. It is said that the Lord of Martyrs, Imam Husain (a.s.) wept in his prayer when returning to hereafter.
Eating and drinking.
Folding hands (i.e. placing one hand on the other at prayer).
Saying “Amin” after Surah al-Hamd.

Source: Grand Ayatollah Sayyid Ali Al-Sistani